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THE THREE

The world is stunned when four commuter planes crash within hours of each other on different continents. Facing global panic, officials are under pressure to find the causes. With terrorist attacks and environmental factors ruled out, there doesn’t appear to be a correlation between the crashes, except that in three of the four air disasters a child survivor is found in the wreckage.

Dubbed ‘The Three’ by the international press, the children all exhibit disturbing behavioural problems, presumably caused by the horror they lived through and the unrelenting press attention. This attention becomes more than just intrusive when a rapture cult led by a charismatic evangelical minister insists that the survivors are three of the four harbingers of the apocalypse. The Three are forced to go into hiding, but as the children’s behaviour becomes increasingly disturbing, even their guardians begin to question their miraculous survival . . .


PRESS

Some press articles will contain spoilers! You've been warned.

Hodder & Stoughton Book Trailer

Audiobook Excerpt

REVIEWS

THE THREE is really wonderful. A cross between Michael Crichton and Shirley Jackson, hard to put down and vastly entertaining. STEPHEN KING

Sarah Lotz is a ferociously imaginative storyteller whose twisty plots will kick the stairs out from under you. She's a talent to watch. LAUREN BEUKES

The finest thriller I've read in years. Dark, subtle and completely unputdownable, I was enthralled from the opening line to the last. SARAH PINBOROUGH

Compulsive reading. MARIE-CLAIRE

Sarah Lotz has just written the perfect horror story. This will be undoubtedly one of the best horror stories published in 2014. THE BOOK PLANK

It's reminiscent of Stephen King's CARRIE and THE THREE comes preloaded with praise from the master of horror himself. It deserves it: this high-concept thriller is a blast. THE GUARDIAN

Tiptoeing the tightrope between fantasy and horror. DAILY MAIL

One of the finest, freakiest horror novels I've read. CHUCK WENDIG

The author's use of the oral-history format, with its shifting voices and points of view, is a stroke of genius: the reader is in a state of near-constant confusion at the beginning, which is slowly replaced by unease and then dread as the various commentators start to see the bigger picture. A very creepy, very effective novel. DAVID PITT, BOOKLIST